Why I Cancelled GoDaddy…

“It’s just not right that so many things don’t work when they should. I don’t think that will change for a long time.” – Steve Wozniak

After a ten-year plus relationship with GoDaddy, I’ve closed my account. It felt good as GoDaddy of today isn’t what GoDaddy was ten years ago.  I argue the service has been getting worse as time as gone on, just like Network Solutions.  These companies might be forgetting what got them there in the first place.  Here are my reasons and my next steps.

Why GoDaddy Worked

  1. Lost cost. Very competitive pricing.
  2. Good technical support. I did have a couple of problems and their support was great.  Even restored my DotNetNuke website back to a functional level.  Gave them mad kudos’ for that.
  3. Great DNS Management. I argue the simplest in the business.

Why I Said No to GoDaddy

  1.  My hosted WordPress site was painfully slow using the Economy hosting. Every time I publish, the website would go offline and timeout for 3-5 minutes. Every time. Call up GoDaddy and support would say I am on shared services. If I need more speed, need to upgrade. The speed issue exacerbated module and version upgrades. The last straw was a failed JetPack upgrade due to timeouts. No more.
  2. GoDaddy’s management site is slow. I’d log into my portal and it clocks transitioning between screens. Constant pop ups with new products and ads, but getting to the guts has slowed way down from ten years ago. Super annoying to embed in the management interfaces. Not good.
  3. No support for free SSL. I’ve been talking to them about this for a long time. There are many competitive offers out there offering a free SSL cert for a single WordPress site. If you’re a singular blogger or small business, why not a free SSL cert? No support for Let’s Encrypt. In fact, they’ve designed their system to prevent it without hacking their system. Not supporting these technologies may seem like protecting their turf. I argue it’s an example of legacy companies not getting with modern times. Fail.
  4. On and on sales phone calls. GoDaddy would call me and try to up sell me on products, many I didn’t need.  When I talked about my slow website and lack of support for Let’s Encrypt, the sales guy started dodging.  I’d hang up and get another call a week later, resuming the up sell. Finally, had to tell them to stop calling me. Sales pressure tactics when you’re not trying to fix your product or ease my pain means you don’t care about me.  Bottom line.

And I had to call to cancel. Digital transformation not apparently in effect at Godaddy. I was genuinely worried I would be pressured just like a gym membership. Alas, “Joel” took my call and walked me through. I asked for a refund for my remaining months and got it.  A+ Joel.  I might come back.

Where Did I Go?

I transitioned to Dreamhost. Performance has been far better, although they need to work on their management tools. User interface needs much work. But, it’s very nice to functional without wait times for the same money.

One More Thing…

Colleagues have pointed me to NameSilo as an inexpensive domain name registrar. I’ve been using them for a few domains and really like their interface and pricing.

\\ JMM

“Secure” is not a binary, black-and-white thing.

“Secure” is not a binary, black-and-white thing. Instead, it’s about risk management. Instead of asking whether something is secure, it’s better to ask whether it is “secure enough for such-and-such purpose”. – Quote from Crypto Stack Exchange, August 2013

I seem to be talking a lot about security these days.  Not only in my professional life, but in my personal day to day.

I am considering shifting my family from Windows phone over to Android, despite the personal pains supporting this ecosystem that worked flawlessly for me for many years.  The security conversation in this context is rife is opinion and observation from friends and colleagues.  Everything from Android’ inherent security challenges to hackers leveraging Google Play to distribute bad wares.  Admittedly, I will lose some sleep knowing my family’s desire to load hundreds of apps.

Getting the Microsoft ecosystem connected onto an Android phone requires passwords and access to applications that will not be understood as to why.  Just going through the motions.  For example, the password vault we’ve been using in my family worked only on Windows phone.  We need to consider what tool works well in the Android space, ease of transference, and retraining my family members to use this tool.  Further, vaults need access and will prompt if it can obtain rights to reach or access areas of the operating system.  Another situation rife with chance of malfeasance.

When I researched a deck on security back at Santander, I found the above quote and it immediately returns to mind when I talk security in both spaces today.  Many organizations take a harder line to reach the goal of “secure”, damn productivity and usability.  Compliance works for larger organizations under audit scrutiny.  But many companies do not operate in those industries.  Neither do families.

Nevertheless, when I look at technologies, you have to look at the people at the helm.  Combined, risks can be pondered and formulated. And after thoughtful interaction and use cases, discussion with the people using the technologies, making the arguments pro and con, can you make the right decision for those users.  As often times, technologies are often secure enough when powered by security conscious people.

My recent thoughts on the matter.

\\ JMM

Rob England IS the IT Skeptic

“You don’t change culture team by team or app by app. You don’t get to pick and choose where you DevOps. You can do it for a while – operating bi-modally – in order to experiment, to allow new ways of working to incubate, but it is essential to converge quickly. DevOps is not a piecemeal tool, it is an organisational transformation.” – The IT Skeptic Blog, July 22, 2017

This blog isn’t about DevOps.  There are now thousands to choose from with authors off all walks.  This blog is about Rob England and his blog, The IT Skeptic.

If you haven’t read this blog, start.  It’s a must read.  In fact, I’ve spent evenings rolling through his old content to follow his train of thought in the hottest topics all IT shops struggle with:  How to do IT service delivery, effectively.  It’s an art.  It’s not simple.  And done poorly, costs organizations dearly.

I do not have a recommendation where to start.  If you read his last blog, currently on December 5, 2017, it’s titled, “Project Management was the worst thing that ever happened to IT“… Wow.  And right on target.  Do organizations think this way?  Most can not.

\\ JMM

Microsoft Kills Mobile…

Joe Belfiore @joebelfiore – Oct 8
Actually, a huge, huge majority of our Windows/Office (and Xbox) users are mixed-ecosystem. MOST people have a different phone than “PC”

Ingo @LaktoseIgnoranz
Replying to @joebelfiore
When people switch to iOS or Android they will switch ecosystems, too. No more need for Microsoft then. That’ll be your next big problem.

It has never been a more confusing… frustrating… no infuriating time for Microsoft developers and professionals. Twenty years of evangelizing the technologies, investing in the products, moving organizations, friends, and family, and for a time enjoying the benefits of a homogeneous ecosystem. Yet, this year, a constant barrage of fear, uncertainty, and doubt about Microsoft strategy from Microsoft pundits, talking heads, industry leaders, and peers.

The Microsoft code strategy has been under attack for decades, yet Microsoft appears to be succumbing to Linux via Android. It’s absolutely no secret Microsoft is heavily invested in Android. It’s disturbing to see this manifesting in Microsoft stores proudly selling Samsung Galaxy phones promoting the Office productivity suite.

Shifting away from Windows mobile is a questionable strategy. Our next phone now requires me to have a Google or Apple account with similar cloud strategies. A Microsoft failure to deliver on either of those platforms will speed a demise due to the lack of a unified endpoint platform. This is an uncomfortable gamble shifting from OS platforms to applications/cloud platforms. Untrue? No Windows mobile or universal app developers will continue to diminish the OS, folks. Why would consumers pay for this platform?

We are very different companies [from Apple and Google] …We are a tool creator … not a luxury good manufacturer. We are about creating technologies so that others can build. [With] Surface, we created a premium product … every OEM should create a lower-priced model. We want to democratize things. – CEO Satya Nadella

I would never believed I would have seen or heard in my Microsoft career at a Microsoft store, the sales person actively telling groups of people in the store, “Microsoft technologies are actually better on Android.” I am equally shocked to read a recent Joe Belfiore tweet, “Go download Edge from Google Play”.

Solution: Return to your roots and focus.

  1. Compete with Linux on their own ground. How? Open source the base Windows OS.
  2. Tier the OS based on function to support business. “Windows Basic” should align to Linux features and functions. “Windows Enterprise Desktop” for endpoints needing business features. “Windows Enterprise Server” for the server.
  3. Give away Visual Studio and continue to train people through MVA.
  4. Get out of the hardware business. Support your partners and OEMs.

Make Windows attractive again to both consumers, businesses, and developers!

\\ JMM

Status Of Lanvera: Confidence Is Building…

August is my three month mark working at LANVERA. The IT transformation is in full swing and much of the work we have been working on is being felt.  The leaders report three months of network infrastructure stability and confidence is building. This is good for morale across the organization and I am humbled by the hard work.

Our highlights to this point are:

  1.  We hired our security-focused system engineer, Jeromey Lange.  A seasoned technical veteran and leader, Jeromey is going to bring a dimension to the team to reinforce the DevOps culture Steve Taff and I are trying to build.  Certifications include VCP, MCSA, MTA, ITILv3, and Tintri.  He is going to take on Alien Vault USM and run our security practice. A next level player.
  2. The commitment to VMWARE NSX and SDN. With heated discussion and negotiation, the engineers are taking on VMWARE’s NSX technology. We’ve chosen Mobius to partner with us to lead us through our NSX rollout. This milestone is particularly significant as our hopes this decision will see meaningful gains as our DevOps platform.
  3. Workstation Technology Refresh projects kicks off earnestly with work on hardware standards and continued support to develop on the Microsoft platform. Considerable time being spent working the requirements and desired specifications nets decisions of continued use of Dell hardware.
  4. McGuire Solutions has wrapped up the network engineering work and submitted his recommendations. The physical network is comprised of mostly security components on a Cisco Nexus backend. Greg’s team will be engaged to realize the solution starting in September!
  5. Investment in Coppell’s datacenter. We will be upgrading the internal infrastructure to uplift the technology foundation. Examples are patch panel rewire, electrical re-wire, electrical redistribution, and upgrading to cabinets.

Always forward!

\\ JMM

“Everything You Want Is On The Other Side Of Fear”

Quote from the movie Atomic Blonde, a slogan scrawled across a Berlin wall in the pre-Berlin wall era.  Having lived in that time period, the movie certainly plays out the 80s themes with music to match.  The characters blithley lighting up cigarettes and often pouring themselves a drink as the plot rains down violence in a world of secret agents and film noir.

And yet, the movie has an unsettling grittiness that is surmised in this quote.

\\ JMM

The Force Of Movement… It’s On You.

“You decide. To have a good attitude or to have a bad attitude. To respond or to react. To give generously or to give begrudgingly. To offer a helping hand or to look away. To help others up or to look past them. To invest in yourself or to coast through life. You decide.” – Tom Ziglar

Today’s blog’s message came through the various communications with former colleagues that put a reoccurring theme to the week. In essence, many verbalized frustration with the lack of career opportunities and disappointment that careers are motionless and not financially meeting goals at that point in there life.

Before I give words of encouragement, let’s talk about you. Let’s talk about your performance over the past twelve months. How did you progress on your goals? What did you achieve so far this year? What education goals did you hit? Who did you mentor with? How have you invested in yourself?  Now prove it.

Many of my colleagues who are stuck will leave the organization they are in at the same state of self investment as they arrived. And still fail to recognize the competitive nature of our market and complain to anyone who will listen about their circumstances.  Experience alone doesn’t give the force of movement to careers.  Something must propel it forward, intentionally and consistently.

This is the message: You are accountable for your career. Not your employer, not your family, not your community, and not your government. You have the power to change you. The resources are out there. Your leaders gave you opportunities to grow and you chose not to.

Hard message. But necessary in this time of indignation and entitlement.  Consistent Action = Consistent Results.  Put that Xbox controller down.  Turn off Dr. Who.  Open a book.  Talk to a teacher.  Get a plan for yourself.

Zig Ziglar often has extolled the virtues of attitude, goals, and investing in yourself.  This is the roadmap of winners.  You have the capability to win.   No more excuses, team!  Go do it.  Today.

\\ JMM

Find Your Team…

“The best prize life has to offer is a chance to work hard at work worth doing. And I would add that what makes work worth doing is getting to do it with people you love. Find your team.” – Leslie Knope, Season 7, Ep13, One Last Ride: Part 2

I will admit, I’ve never watched one episode of Parks and Recreation.  My wife asked if we could watch the last episode and, agreeing apprehensively, off we go.  Although I didn’t get much context to characters, this line caught me towards the end of the show:  Find your team.

So true.  So hard to do.  And blessed when we can.

Find your team and do great work.  Yes, I will.

\\ JMM

My Next Chapter: Lanvera – Delivering Documents With Intelligence

I am happy to announce I have accepted the position of Director, IT Infrastructure with Lanvera, Ltd. I am excited by this opportunity to work with leaders John Baldridge, President, Steve Taff, CIO, and Ronnie Howell, CTO, leading this organization to the next technology evolution.

Thank you to those close friends and colleagues that helped with leads and encouragement. I am honored and humbled to have an great collection of network of professionals.

“Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is always to try just one more time.” – Thomas A. Edison

Now, onto the next chapter.

\\ JMM